echecs16.info Theory HIDDEN FIGURES BOOK

HIDDEN FIGURES BOOK

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Based on the New York Times bestselling book and the Academy Award– nominated movie, author Margot Lee Shetterly and Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor. Before a computer became an inanimate object and before Sputnik changed the course of history, before the Supreme Court case Brown v. MARGOT LEE SHETTERLY'S Hidden Figures is the story and . He's another hidden figure in the book, or more of a forgotten figure. He was.


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Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Who Helped Win the Space Race is a nonfiction book written by Margot. Hidden Figures book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The #1 New York Times Bestseller. Set amid the civil rights movem. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Discover delightful children's books with Prime Book Box, a subscription that.

Called the West Computers, after the area to which they were relegated, they helped blaze a trail for mathematicians and engineers of all races and genders to follow. The book's film adaptation, starring Octavia Spencer and Taraji P. Henson, is now open in theaters. Growing up in Hampton, Virginia, in the s, Shetterly lived just miles away from Langley. Built in , this research complex was the headquarters for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics NACA which was intended to turn the floundering flying gadgets of the day into war machines.

Growing up in Hampton, Virginia, in the s, Shetterly lived just miles away from Langley. Built in , this research complex was the headquarters for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics NACA which was intended to turn the floundering flying gadgets of the day into war machines.

They worked through equations that described every function of the plane, running the numbers often with no sense of the greater mission of the project. They contributed to the ever-changing design of a menagerie of wartime flying machines, making them faster, safer, more aerodynamic. Eventually their stellar work allowed some to leave the computing pool for specific projects— Christine Darden worked to advance supersonic flight, Katherine Johnson calculated the trajectories for the Mercury and Apollo missions.

NASA dissolved the remaining few human computers in the s as the technological advances made their roles obsolete. Though the pressing needs of war were great, racial discrimination remained strong and few jobs existed for African-Americans, regardless of gender. That was until when A. Chrome On the Control button top right of browser , select Settings from dropdown.

Under the header JavaScript select the following radio button: Allow all sites to run JavaScript recommended. Hidden Figures: Prices and offers may vary in store. Kobo ebook. About The Author.

She is an Alfred P.

Figures book hidden

Sloan Foundation Fellow and the recipient of a Virginia Foundation of the Humanities grant for her research on women in computing. She lives in Charlottesville, VA. Paperback Dimensions: September 5, Publisher: HarperCollins Language: The following ISBNs are associated with this title: Look for similar items by category: Books History Americas.

Customer Reviews of Hidden Figures: Select Parent Grandparent Teacher Kid at heart. Age of the child I gave this to: Hours of Play: Tell Us Where You Are: Preview Your Review.

Thank you. Your review has been submitted and will appear here shortly. Nice to learn more about everything that went into it. Date published: Rated 2 out of 5 by Sarahhhh from Could have been better Could have been better There's only so much wiggle room when writing a non-fiction book, but man! This was so dry at times, and there is little sense of chronology. The book, for me, failed to draw me in. These are some incredible women, but the book didn't really bring them to life in the way, for example, A Beautiful Mind humanized John Nash.

Rated 2 out of 5 by Sarahhhh from Could have been better There's only so much wiggle room when writing a non-fiction book, but man! Rated 4 out of 5 by Justin from Great story I really enjoyed learning about these women and their counterparts in the journey to taking man to the moon.

The book was very detailed and informative, sometimes too much, it was almost like there was just as much filler material as there was to the base story. Rated 5 out of 5 by Melanie from Amazing true story Amazing true story of the brilliant minds of strong women.

Rated 4 out of 5 by Brittany from Great read, great price. I became interested in this book after watching the movie.

It provides a lot more detail and character development vs the movie. Rated 4 out of 5 by Momtoboy from Very good. Very good and captivating book. Rated 4 out of 5 by Pumpkin from Keeping track of names! Lots of amazing history that is untold about the space race and black history.

Figures book hidden

But as a person who struggles with names, this was a challenging book to get into and finish. Glad I saw the movie first as it helped to keep things organized and give a face to events and the racism that are part of the history.

Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly

Rated 5 out of 5 by smachan from Interesting Book! You can learn many things from this interesting book! I recommend you read this book, especially if you are interested in computer science. Rated 5 out of 5 by Katelyn from fascinating absolutely worth the read. Rated 5 out of 5 by Adrienne from Why on earth were we not taught this in history class??!! We need more books about POC! I couldn't put this book down, it was so inspiring to read about these ladies trials and accomplishments!

Rated 5 out of 5 by Bibi from Amazing Fantastic and inspirational read. We need more books on WOC's accomplishments. These ladies are my heros! Rated 5 out of 5 by Melissa from Feel good book!

Such a great book, its definitely a feel good book, the accomplishments of these women are inspiring! I would recommend this to all my friends. Rated 4 out of 5 by Katie from Great book!!!

Very detailed orientated and pleasing. Rated 5 out of 5 by Anna from Wow! I could barely put this down. Very detailed--had to push through all the sciencey stuff, but still amazing. Rated 4 out of 5 by Strawberry from EXcellent! What a fantastic books. Feelings of happiness, butterflies, angry, happiness all rolled into one book! Rated 5 out of 5 by tgal from enjoyed the book- inspiring and thought provoking. It makes me wonder how many more people were kept out of the history books, because of their gender- or the colour of their skin.

And with all the successes of the Civil Rights Movement- why does it feel that the world is moving backward, to where the colour of your skin, your religion, or our many other differences, again determines if you are accepted, and how you are treated. The book is almost mind-numbingly boring.

Hidden Figures

The details on math and science are one thing - I can get through that - but overall, even when talking about racism or segregation, Shetterly is boring and not engaging. This is horrible - the subject material in this book is naturally interesting IMO. It should not have been such a struggle for Shetterly to make this book interesting. I often found myself wondering how she could make such an interesting topic so boring. She is not a good writer. I was getting so frustrated with her terrible writing.

Again, it was not any grammar, spelling or sentence problems. Instead, it is her schmaltzy, emotionally manipulative and bogged-down writing style which was grating my cheese.

Let me give you some examples: Katherine listened intently as her brother-in-law described the work, her thumb cradling her chin, her index finger extended along her cheek, the signal that she was listening carefully. Why would she? Seeing this in non-fiction is really jarring.

For one thing, she was reporting on a conversation she was not present at. Secondly, she is hearing about it from someone who is relating something that happened nearly 60 years ago.

Book hidden figures

Third, it's just bad writing. I mean, look at it. So bad. Why would you feel the need to put a sentence like this in your book? Spaceship-flying computers might be the future, but it didn't mean John Glenn had to trust them.

He did, however, trust the brainy fellas who controlled the computers. It was as simple as eighth-grade math: by the transitive property of equality, therefore, John Glenn trusted Katherine Johnson.

Ugh, this writing is atrocious. For one thing, It was as simple as eighth-grade math: by the transitive property of equality, What the heck is Shetterly doing?

Hidden Figures : The Untold Story of the African American Women Who Helped Win the Space Race

Does she think this is cute? I just Secondly, why is Shetterly pushing this so hard? Glenn asked the men to check the numbers. The men asked Katherine because she was competent and smart.

Shetterly shouldn't feel the need to play this up as if Glenn went to Katherine Johnson herself and humbly put his trust in her to double-check the numbers. He didn't. He gave the work to some men and they shunted it to her because she had skillz.