echecs16.info Theory BUCK MORSS AESTHETICS AND ANAESTHETICS PDF

BUCK MORSS AESTHETICS AND ANAESTHETICS PDF

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aesthetics is political anaesthesia. Bypassing the Susan Buck-Morss re-joins aesthetics to the an- archy of PDF of their seven custom high-security designs. “Aesthetics and Anaesthetics: Walter Benjamin's Artwork Essay Reconsidered.” Mechanical Reproduction,” Buck-Morss summarizes the development of the. Aesthetics and Anaesthetics, Part I. Walter Benjamin's Artwork Essay Reconsidered. I am grateful to Joan Sage for her help with the photographs for this piece.


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Aesthetics and Anaesthetics: Walter Benjamin's Artwork. Essay Reconsidered*. SUSAN BUCK-MORSS. Walter Benjamin's essay "The Work of Art in the Age of. Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at. Aesthetics and Anaesthetics: Walter Benjamin's Artwork Essay Reconsidered Author(s): Susan Buck-Morss Reviewed work(s): Source: October, Vol. 62 ( Autumn.

That date will be remembered as the beginning of the financial crisis we are now experiencing -the second worst in history, or so they say. From that moment on, the discourse on which our current system of debt and precariousness is predicated began to spread, and many people subscribed to the belief that this crisis would be our end or, at the very least, would leave us seriously wounded, as if it were impossible to glimpse alternatives outside of that enforced reality. It became clear that our nation-states are colluding with the markets to globalize speculation, and as citizens we felt abandoned: we were up for sale. It took us a while to react, still reeling from the shock of waking up one morning to find ourselves on the verge of bankruptcy. The disorientation that followed the shock was accentuated by our scepticism about the effectiveness of traditional forms of protest and our inability to imagine other possible worlds.

The moral will, cleansed of any contamination by the senses which, in the First Critique, are the source of all cognition , sets up its own rule as a universal norm. It affirmed the aesthetic beauty, first and foremost, of the male body.

Indeed, homoerotic sensuality may have been even more threatening to the emerging modernist psyche than the reproductive sexuality of women. It is in this sense, in fact, that he came to be understood….

At the end of the century, with Nietzsche, there is a new affirmation of the body, but it remains self-contained, taking the highest pleasure in its own biophysical emanations. One could go on documenting this solipsistic — and often truly silly — fantasy of the phallus, this tale of all-male reproduction, the magic art of creation ex nihilo. And that is to trace the development, not of the meaning of terms, but of the human sensorium itself.

IV The senses are effects of the nervous system, composed of hundreds of billions of neurons extending from the body surfaces through the spinal cord, to the brain. The brain, it must be said, yields to philosophical reflection a sense of the uncanny.

In our most empiricist moments, we would like to take the matter of the brain itself for the mind. What could be more appropriate than the brain studying the brain? But there seems to be such an abyss between us, alive, as we look out on the world, and that gray-white gelatinous mass with its cauliflower-like convolutions that is the brain the biochemistry of which does not differ qualitatively from that of a sea slug that, intuitively, we resist naming them as identical. Hegel thus has intuition on his side in his attacks against the brain-watchers.

If you want to know what the mind is, examine what it does — thus is philosophy turned away from natural science to the study of human culture and human history.

The circuit from sense-perception to motor response begins and ends in the world. The brain is thus not an isolable anatomical body, but part of a system that passes through the person and her or his culturally specific, historically transient environment. As the source of stimuli and the arena for motor response, the external world must be included to complete the sensory circuit.

Pollard Birches. Not only is it open to the world through the sensory organs, but the nerve cells within the body form a network that is in itself discontinuous. They reach out toward other nerve cells at points called synapses, where electrical charges pass through the space between them. The giant, pyramid-like layer of cells in the brain cortex was first described in by the Ukrainian anatomist Vladimir Betz.

Remy, found this form replicated in the external world. The expressive face is, indeed, a wonder of synthesis, as individual as a fingerprint, yet legible by common sense. On it the three aspects of the synaesthetic system — physical sensation, motor reaction, and psychical meaning — converge in signs and gestures comprising a mimetic language. What this language speaks is anything but the concept. Hegel, writing The Phenomenology of Mind in his Jena study in , interpreted the advancing army of Napoleon whose cannons he could hear roaring in the distance as the unwitting realization of Reason.

Sir Charles Bell, who, as a field doctor performing limb amputations, was physically present a decade later at the Battle of Waterloo, had a different interpretation: It is a misfortune to have our sentiments at variance with the universal sentiment.

But there must ever be associated with the honours of Waterloo, in my eyes, the shocking signs of woe: to my ears, accents of intensity, outcry from the manly breast, interrupted, forcible expressions from the dying — and noisome smells. I must show you my note book [with sketches of the wounded], for … it may convey an excuse for this excess of sentiment.

It could not be given meaning. The category of rationality could be applied to these physiological perceptions only in the sense of rationalization. It centers on shock. The more readily consciousness registers these shocks, the less likely they are to have a traumatic effect. Without the depth of memory, experience is impoverished. In industrial production no less than modern warfare, in street crowds and erotic encounters, in amusement parks and gambling casinos, shock is the very essence of modern experience.

As the source of stimuli and the arena for motor response, the external world must be included to complete the sensory circuit.

Walter Benjamin and the Aesthetics of Change

Pollard Birches. Not only is it open to the world through the sensory organs, but the nerve cells within the body form a network that is in itself discontinuous. They reach out toward other nerve cells at points called synapses, where electrical charges pass through the space between them. The giant, pyramid-like layer of cells in the brain cortex was first described in by the Ukrainian anatomist Vladimir Betz.

Remy, found this form replicated in the external world. The expressive face is, indeed, a wonder of synthesis, as individual as a fingerprint, yet legible by common sense. On it the three aspects of the synaesthetic system — physical sensation, motor reaction, and psychical meaning — converge in signs and gestures comprising a mimetic language. What this language speaks is anything but the concept. Hegel, writing The Phenomenology of Mind in his Jena study in , interpreted the advancing army of Napoleon whose cannons he could hear roaring in the distance as the unwitting realization of Reason.

Sir Charles Bell, who, as a field doctor performing limb amputations, was physically present a decade later at the Battle of Waterloo, had a different interpretation: It is a misfortune to have our sentiments at variance with the universal sentiment.

But there must ever be associated with the honours of Waterloo, in my eyes, the shocking signs of woe: to my ears, accents of intensity, outcry from the manly breast, interrupted, forcible expressions from the dying — and noisome smells.

I must show you my note book [with sketches of the wounded], for … it may convey an excuse for this excess of sentiment. It could not be given meaning. The category of rationality could be applied to these physiological perceptions only in the sense of rationalization. It centers on shock. The more readily consciousness registers these shocks, the less likely they are to have a traumatic effect. Without the depth of memory, experience is impoverished.

Anaesthetics and buck pdf morss aesthetics

In industrial production no less than modern warfare, in street crowds and erotic encounters, in amusement parks and gambling casinos, shock is the very essence of modern experience. The effect on the synaesthetic system 53 is brutalizing. As a result, the system reverses its role. Its goal is to numb the organism, to deaden the senses, to repress memory: the cognitive system of synaesthetics has become, rather, one of anaesthetics. Bombarded with fragmentary impressions they see too much — and register nothing.

Thus the simultaneity of overstimulation and numbness is characteristic of the new synaesthetic organization as anaesthetics. Continue to Part Two. This is the now-conventional English translation see Harry Zohn, trans. See Walter Benjamin, Gesammelte Schriften, , ed. Rolf Tiedemann and Hermann Schweppenhaeuser Frankfurt a. Once art is drawn into politics Communist politics no less than Fascist politics how could it help but put itself into its service, thus to render up to politics its own artistic powers, i.

It could be argued, for example, that precisely in its most biological aspect reproduction of our species , the privatized family is unsocial. Schweizer claims, against Croce, that Baumgarten was not overly concerned or apologetic, and that the real bias against the aesthetic is a later develop.

Similarly, Machiavelli wrote in praise of the Prince who self-creatively founds a new principality, and connects this autogenetic act with the height of manliness. For an excellent discussion of the parameters of the feminist debate, see articles by Seyla Benhabib, Judith Butler, and Nancy Frazer in Praxis International 2 July , pp.

And aesthetics pdf anaesthetics morss buck

Werner S. Pluhar [Indianapolis: Hackett, ], p. Those garments made of different fabrics in a variety of colours, designed to be worn as capes or robes, were a kind of transportable device that became part of the body and offered wearers a multisensory experience involving values that went beyond the purely visual. Therefore, it is not about interpreting the body as the support surface of the work.

Quite the contrary -it is an absolute incorporation, the incorporation of the body in the work and of the work in the body. These are works that defy interpretation and go out in search of interpretation.

What remains is actually nothing more than the proposal of the great invention, something that motivates the participant, the former spectator who is now also a participant -something that prompts him to attain a state of invention.

For this reason, the concept of the artist does not exist.

The artist can only be an inventor; otherwise, he is not an artist. These works appeal directly to the sensory self, without intellectual digressions, showing us that it is possible to construct knowledge using parts of the body other than the rational mind; they impact directly on our subjectivity, activating dormant impulses.

In fact, we cannot deny that the invention, experience and rediscovery of impulses and affects resulting from the activation of his proposals had a destabilizing effect on the participants and motivated them to produce new forms of subjectivity.

Poking holes in reality. On bodies, images and squares - Re-visiones

This meant that the action was operating on different levels of participation and involvement, while also generating a shared experience that revolved around a proposed situation. Just as the Situationists sought to revive the radical political potential of Surrealism, so the actions of Fast Gallery activate new poetics by allowing imagination to find release through our bodies, opening our eyes to new and hitherto unimagined forms of radical politics.

Flags Parade, Fast Gallery, This mobile flag exhibition ended up being a celebration, a takeover of the streets, a liberation of desires and a free outpouring of subjectivities. It was a time of playful rebellion and vibrating bodies in which the participants were not seen as objects but as agents capable of constructing meaning and generating new worlds from their subjectivities. On that occasion, as in other similar practices, the boundary between the person doing and the person watching, the one who arranges and the one who must decode meanings, was blurred.

In this context, improvisation and indeterminacy are fundamental elements that stand in sharp contrast to the homogenizing intentions of the establishment, creating situations that seek to alter the order imposed by the agenda of state apparatuses.

While Oiticica offered us a work of art that could be worn, Fast Gallery invited us to make our body part of the flag and stroll through the city in a whole new way, turning it into a vast stage on which our presence suddenly becomes essential. Obviously, we cannot ignore the way in which this action effectively took possession of the public sphere.

Aesthetics and Anaesthetics, Part I

But -and this is crucial- neither was it the exact opposite; it was not a nihilist demonstration, though there was no shortage of Dadaist and absurd elements. The demonstration was both subjective and aesthetic. And here we see another link between Oiticica and Fast Gallery, for both engaged in non-activist practices -in other words, they did not use direct action- but, as projects that unfolded in a community and on the street, they proposed a certain activation of the senses and spaces that made them -and, as we recall them today, still makes them- radically political.

As Suely Rolnik , p. And some political practices, such as those in the square, have a similar effect on us. Like these two examples, many other proposals of recent decades were motivated by an interest in restoring our lost perception, as well as the type of involvement required for new, more participatory, less spectral forms of democracy than the existing version to flourish.

One of the most frequently voiced criticisms of the May 15 movement is that it lacks an intellectual basis, that it is purely emotional -as if the emotions produced by the vibration of our bodies in the square were not capable of altering our experiences and later spilling over into our relationships outside the square.

This raises an interesting question: Are emotions and affects not forms of thought? Do they not condition how we live in the world? On this point, we might find it helpful to think of democracy as a political form that does not resolve the issue of conflict, antagonism and decision. Images in Conflict: New Currents for Representations But let us return to the square, to that public square filled with jostling bodies that vibrate and construct a sphere of reality separate from that of capital.

The emergence of the political depends upon the appearance of bodies -and not just physical bodies, but their images as well.

Aesthetics pdf morss buck and anaesthetics

That diffuse Twitter model creates a formless multitude which refuses to be standardised in a representation and builds a new world simply by proclaiming its existence over and over again on the networks and in the streets.