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WARHAMMER NIPPON PDF

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A comprehensive update of the Nippon Warhammer Fantasy Battle Army for 8th Edition rules. Nippon Army Book Cover - PDF download. This Nippon army is completely unofficial and is not endorsed by Games Workshop. view online or download by clicking the army book cover. Nippon has now been updated to 8th edition. Very minor rules changes to bring the book in line with the current rules. New units included.


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Whispers have been heard, rumors, that beyond the glittering shores of far-off Cathay there lies a small island nation, the last bastion of the race of Man before the rolling expanse of the Far Sea. Tales tell of proud warriors with blades like razors, armor of wood as strong as steel, who cover their faces with shocking masks and wield the souls of their ancestors like a magick. Stories abound of unnatural creatures who call the island home, living and fighting alongside its colorful human The truth behind these tales is more fantastic still. An entire culture, thriving under the sun and sequestered from the world by ancient magic, has finally swelled beyond its borders. At last, ships set sails emblazoned with outlandish emblems, and steer for the shores of the Old World. The Empire of Nippon has made itself known, a rumor no more, and the shadows of the world shall bow before the might of the Sun.

Fortunately - or unfortunately, depending upon whom you ask - the Empire's history has been full of war and conflict, giving the samurai of Nippon plenty of opportunity for self-sacrifice. The Nipponese believe all living beings, indeed all of existence, are organized into a hierarchy set in place by the will of the Celestial Heavens. This hierarchy — known as the Celestial Order — was revealed to the Nipponese by the Kami at the founding of the Empire, and they regard it as the sacred and unquestioned expression of divine will.

To ignore or violate the Order is to blaspheme against the cosmos itself. Thus, the citizens of the Land of the Rising Sun are organized into three distinct castes, each of which is divided into several smaller ranks and sub-castes. Typically, a person is born into a caste and remains within that caste for their entire life, although exceptions are possible.

Conversely, a samurai can easily lord it over those of inferior social rank, and it is expected that such abuse will be endured honourably. At the top of the social order are the samurai, the rulers of Nippon. The samurai caste itself is, of course, divided into social ranks of its own — the Kuge nobility and the Buke those who serve.

The Kuge include the Emperor, the various high Imperial officials and daimyo, the Clan Champions who rule over the various clans of the Empire, and the daimyo of the various families within each clan. All other samurai belong to the Buke. They are generally not permitted to use weapons, although exceptions are made for specific duties such as Ashigaru peasant military levies or budoka personal armed retainers to samurai.

Samurai can demand anything from a heimin without recompense, and can kill any heimin who disobeys or fails to show respect. However, the Celestial Order also dictates that there are responsibilities between the different castes of society, something emphasized in writings like the Articles of Heaven. Nevertheless, the life of the bonge is a hard one, full of difficult labour and suffering.

Only a few commoners are fortunate enough to serve a samurai who truly cares about them — for the most part, their lords treat them with indifference, if not outright cruelty.

Naturally, heimin are always respectful and obedient toward samurai, since the alternative is to earn their wrath, but they seldom feel anything toward their masters other than fear and wary respect. However, the rare samurai who goes out of his way to fulfil his duties to the heimin caste will soon draw their notice, and such exceptionally compassionate samurai are often rewarded in turn by extra loyalty and effort. Even within the ranks of the bonge, there are social striations.

The highest-ranking of the heimin are the peasants, for they grow the food which all the Empire needs to survive. Slightly below the peasants are the artisans and craftsmen — carpenters, blacksmiths, stonemasons, brewers, seamstresses, and so forth. Although they do not grow food, these persons still create things of use and value, and truly skilled heimin artisans can actually earn the respect of samurai who admire their work.

In fact, some samurai are artisans themselves, although they pursue rarified arts such as painting and sword-making rather than simple things like building furniture or forging horseshoes. Merchants are regarded with contempt by samurai, since they do not actually make anything for themselves — they simply download and sell things made by others.

Monks occupy a peculiar position within the social order. They are not samurai, and by strict interpretation of the Nipponese social system they cannot be considered anything other than heimin. Most samurai treat monks with a certain deference, and prominent members of the monks are sometimes invited to court to provide counsel and guidance to daimyo.

If the position of monks is peculiar, that of ronin — those samurai who have no lord, no clan or family to call their own — is far more difficult. Some ronin ultimately must engage in manual labour to earn their keep, but as samurai they consider this bitterly shameful, and many of them resort to crime or banditry rather than live like common folk.

Morticians, leatherworkers, and refuse collectors known collectively as eta form the bulk of the hinin caste. Such persons are regarded as less than nothing, and even peasants look down on them and abuse them. The rest of Nippon ignores the eta as much as possible. Although most of the hinin are eta, the ranks of this caste also include a few other individuals.

Pdf warhammer nippon

Torturers, who must constantly inflict harm and touch blood and sweat, are also considered hinin, although they are permitted to serve samurai more directly than the eta. Finally, geisha — women who offer samurai entertainment and companionship — are considered to be hinin, although unlike eta and torturers they are accorded certain fame and respect by the rest of society. This is true for all samurai, whether they be trained as bushi, courtiers, or shugenja.

Although the rituals may differ from clan to clan and family to family, the respect a samurai has for them does not. Even a clan as militaristic and pragmatic as the Crab has all manner of rituals which its samurai follow with care and devotion. The rituals of samurai life begin at birth.

Whenever a samurai child is born, special blessings and religious ceremonies are held to ensure that evil spirits are driven away, lest they curse the child or bring bad fortune upon it. Children enjoy care-free lives in their younger days, although dedicated parents will make sure to remind them of the samurai duties which await when they 11 grow older.

They do learn to read and write, as well as the basics of etiquette and proper behaviour. A key transition point comes when the child is old enough to begin training in one of his or her clan schools. This usually happens between the ages of 10 and 12, although true prodigies may begin their training two or three years earlier.

Almost all samurai attend a school, as failure to do so implies a lack of the skill and dedication expected of them, and it is quite rare for a samurai to be able to switch from one school to another.

The wishes of the child are seldom if ever considered. A family which has served the clan as bushi for ten generations is liable to continue to do so, regardless of what their child might wish. Schooling typically lasts four years, although it can be shorter or longer depending on the talent of the student.

The gempukku ritual varies greatly from one clan, school, or family to another, but in general, it is both a celebration of change from child to adult and a testing to prove what the child has learned. Once the ritual is complete, family and friends offer gifts to the newly-made adult, who is permitted to choose a personal name.

Some prefer to keep their childhood name, but many take a new name to symbolize their hopes for the future or their dedication to family, friends, allies, clan, or Empire. In Nippon, marrying is a duty, typically undertaken at the command of family or lord. Marriages are treated almost as a business matter, and are typically arranged a process called mi-ai by the parents of the couple, often with the help of a middleman, or even a professional matchmaker known as a nakado.

Mi-ai traditionally begins with a formal interview between the parents of the prospective bride and groom.

Warhammer: Nippon (old version)

It is not expected for the couple to be in love, or even to know one another prior to their wedding. The process of arranging a marriage can take anywhere from a few months to several years, and a mi-ai interview is not considered an immediate guarantee of success — rather, these preliminary meetings are done to make sure both sides are comfortable with a future pairing, ensuring an ultimately successful union.

If the two families live far apart, a nakado or other go-between will be enlisted to help ferry messages and gifts back and forth. Among truly high-ranking families it is not uncommon for children to be betrothed long before they reach adulthood. One of the most basic purposes of the Imperial Court is to bring people together in marriages that create alliances and cement bargains for the following year.

Fathers and mothers of noble lineage always bring their most gifted children to the Imperial Court, hoping they will catch some royal eye. Weddings themselves are very elaborate rituals, performed with the presence and supervision of both daimyo and priests, and many blessings and prayers are made to prevent bad fortune, remove evil spirits, and bring harmony and fertility to the match.

Usually the ceremony is held privately, with only the immediate family and a presiding priest, but this is followed by an elaborate public reception in which guests enjoy a magnificent feast and offer numerous gifts to the new couple. The bride traditionally wears white, the colour of death, at the beginning the wedding, symbolizing that she is dead to her old family.

After the ritual is complete and she emerges for the reception, she removes the white kimono to reveal a red one underneath — the colour of life, showing she is reborn into her new family.

Once the ceremony is done, the newly wedded couple often spends a month apart, meditating on what it means to be married, before they take up their new household together. This is not mandatory, however, and samurai in the more active and pragmatic clans will often continue to actively serve their lords long after reaching their fortieth year. High-ranking nobles and daimyo also tend to stay active longer than the normal time.

A samurai who does retire will most commonly choose to join the monks, taking a new name and beginning a new life as a monk or nun. At the conclusion of this ritual, the samurai shaves his head, a transformation symbolizing his entering a new life of religious contemplation.

Not all retiring samurai join the monks, however — some of them instead remain with their families or their lords, living quiet but honoured lives, and offering advice and counsel when it is sought. Retired samurai may also sometimes return to active service, taking up their swords once more when a crisis or threat requires their attention.

These, like everything else in Nippon, follow a strict protocol. By Imperial Law, all bodies must be cremated. The body is anointed and purified by eta, then kept in state with an honour guard until the day of the cremation itself.

Special foods are prepared on that day, and relatives and friends gather to observe the funeral pyre, which is also blessed by shugenja and monks. Once the body has been burned, even more prayers are spoken, to speed the spirit of the departed on its journey to the afterlife. The immediate relatives gather at the pyre and use special chopsticks to remove the remaining fragments of bone from the ashes — these are placed in a crematory urn, which is kept in a place of honour for 35 days before finally being buried, an event accompanied by a final round of prayers, chants, and blessings.

During Nippon's history it has existed as an amorphous mix of nature worship, fertility cults, divination techniques, hero worship, and shamanism and unusually it has no recognised founder. It is a religion of nature and spirituality and the belief that human nature is inherently good, and evil is thought to stem from the individual's contact with external forces or agents that pollute their pure nature and cause them to act in ways which are disruptive.

Jinto worship is centred on the reverence of the gods or kami. Kami may be anything that is extraordinary and that inspires awe or reverence. Consequently, a wide variety of kami exist in Jinto: there are kami related to natural objects and creatures -- the spirits of mountains, seas, rivers, rocks, trees, animals, and the like; there are guardian kami of particular locales and clans; also considered kami are exceptional human beings, including many emperors.

Evil spirits are also known in Jinto, but few seem irredeemably so. While a god may first call attention to its presence through a display of rowdy or even destructive behaviour, generally speaking, the kami are benign. Their role is to sustain and protect. However, the priests of Jinto worship all the gods or kami as one rather than there being any single clerics of a particular god.

Although some gods are more popular than others, such as the Sun Goddess Amateratsu for example, it is highly unusual for anyone to take on a monotheistic perspective.

There are hundreds, perhaps even thousands, of gods in the Jinto pantheon which are discussed further in this chapter but suffice to say the Sun Goddess Amateratsu is one of the most preeminent of the kami as well as the divine couple Zanagi and Zanami who were said to have created Nippon. They quickly came to be accepted by all the clans in Nippon, and as the roles of samurai evolved to include courtiers and artisans, the Code of Bushido evolved into a complete philosophical view of the role and duty of the samurai.

These virtues are held to represent the proper way in which samurai should live and serve their lords. In its ideal form, Bushido values each of these virtues equally, and a samurai is expected to adhere to all of them with equal vehemence. In practice, however, few samurai can live such spotless lives. Moreover, every clan in Nippon views Bushido in a slightly different way, according to their respective views of duty, honour, and life.

The true nature of Bushido is constantly debated within the courts of Nippon, and the true way to uphold its Virtues is seldom fully agreed upon even within the same clan. Every clan, has its idealists who try to uphold every Virtue no matter the cost, just as every clan contains a few dark souls who laugh at Bushido and flout its principles. Compassion Compassion teaches samurai that, as the warrior elite of society, it is their duty to protect and guide the lesser folk of Nippon. In its most obvious form, this means offering military protection, guarding the commoners against bandits, criminals, foreigners, and the monsters of Haikido.

It is this form of Compassion which is most widely respected and revered in Nippon, for all clans recognize the importance of keeping their peasants alive and productive. Bullying or abusing those of lower station is an act unworthy of a samurai, even if the social order allows it.

Some clans take Compassion more fully to heart, however, and seek to offer guidance and help to the lower castes. Indeed, it is popular to say that a samurai lives at all times three feet from death, since that is the reach of a katana.

But in truth there is no clan which ignores courage. All recognize that courage is important if their samurai are to fulfil their duties properly. It should be noted that courage does not mean foolhardiness.

A samurai who throws his life away in a useless and selfish gesture is not behaving honourably, but rather is failing in his duty to lord and clan. Indeed, there are many times when retreating from a fight requires more courage than merely staying and dying. Courtesy Samurai are civilized men and women, not barbarians, and are expected to behave with courtesy and proper manners at all times.

A samurai who shows undue emotion or rudeness is not only violating Courtesy but is also losing his face on , disrespecting those around him and shaming himself. A true samurai remains courteous and well-mannered at all times, even when Honesty Honesty is in principle the simplest of the virtues of Bushido, but also perhaps the most troublesome. Ideally, it would seem obvious that an honourable warrior should always tell the truth, and indeed, there are some families and clans which embrace Honesty with the same fervour as the rest of the virtues.

Honesty is also strongly associated with justice, and thus tends to be a virtue admired by magistrates or at least by those magistrates who take their duties to heart. A samurai who openly insults others is showing his own weakness, which is why Nipponese courtiers endlessly practice the art of the subtle and indirect insult.

Nipponese as a whole make a point of ignoring those who engage in uncouth and improper spectacles, since to draw attention to such discourteous behaviour is to make matters even worse. As one might expect, those who serve their clans in politics and the courts tend to place a very strong emphasis on Courtesy, since it is a vital element of social and political negotiation. However, many other samurai, especially those who serve their clans in court, find that Honesty is often a virtue which must be danced around, or perhaps even violated, in order to fulfil their duties.

Almost all those samurai who serve in the arena of court and politics practice the art of deceiving or manipulating their opponents while still remaining technically truthful, and some families make almost an art form of employing such tactics while still satisfying themselves that they are behaving honourably.

Most highly political schools and families quietly accept that sometimes they will simply have to lie for their clan, and therefore tend to emphasize Sincerity far more than Honesty in their approach to Bushido, counting on their adherence to the other virtues to make up for their sometimes erratic observance of this one. The Scorpion, naturally, ignore Honesty altogether, and exhibit almost open contempt for samurai who strive to tell the truth or who follow the path of justice.

Honour Both the subtlest and the most basic of the virtues, Honour teaches that every samurai stands in judgment over himself, at all times. A samurai without Honour cannot truly follow the other virtues of Bushido, for he is merely acting as others expect, not as his own sense of honour demands. Conversely, a samurai with true Honour will follow the ways of Bushido even when the society around him becomes corrupt and his superiors expect him to behave dishonourably solely because they command it.

Almost all samurai in Nippon respect Honour, for it lies at the very heart of Bushido. Duty If there is a Virtue which competes with Courage for universal acceptance, it is Duty.

A samurai must always be ready to serve his lord in whatever way is required, no matter what the cost. Death is the least that a samurai may face — he must be prepared to endure humiliation, dishonour, shame, and failure for the sake of Duty. He must remain faithful to lord, family, clan, and comrades no matter what temptations may fall in his path. Sincerity Samurai are taught from childhood that they must express absolute sincerity in both word and deed.

A samurai who speaks on behalf of his lord in court, but does so in a lackadaisical or unconvincing manner, is serving his lord as badly as if he refused to speak at all. A samurai who shows a lack of dedication in his actions, who acts and behaves without absolute commitment, is a samurai who fails his lord and his clan. Sincerity is regarded with particular admiration by political clans and families, but most samurai respect it.

It is intrinsic to the belief that samurai are exceptional persons, chosen by birth to serve the Empire in ways that mere peasants cannot. By contrast, a samurai who loses face, who loses self-control, shames both himself and, worse, his family and clan. Face is a purely samurai concept, one that is not expected of peasants and other common folk. Typically, if the disgrace was fairly modest, the samurai will be punished in a non-permanent way — assignment to less prestigious duties, for example, or expulsion from the castle, court, or city where he misbehaved.

Although such punishments are not lethal, they nevertheless represent a deep and profound shame for the samurai involved, who may well spend the rest of his life trying to redeem himself for his failure. More extreme failures, such as a violent outburst, an attack or serious insult against someone of higher station, or a breach of duty or loyalty, are punished much more severely.

A samurai who commits such acts is quite likely to be ordered to commit seppuku if he does not offer seppuku himself out of shame. On other occasions, such disgraced samurai may be expelled from family and clan, and thus made ronin. A samurai may also forsake his fealty and become ronin by his own choice rather than face the prospect of punishment or seppuku, particularly if he feels he is not actually guilty.

Seppuku Seppuku is a form of ritual suicide which samurai perform when they have been irretrievably dishonoured. By performing the ceremony and thus dying honourably, the samurai wipes away the stain of dishonour and leaves his or her family name clean and untarnished. It is important to remember that the main 16 purpose of seppuku is to protect the family, rather than the individual.

I must return it to them untarnished. By committing seppuku, a samurai spares his family from the shame of his deeds. A samurai who is committing seppuku in a formal setting dresses entirely in white the colour of death , and traditionally writes a final poem, a death-haiku, before taking up his wakizashi to commit suicide.

The samurai kneels and makes three cuts across his belly, disembowelling himself. In order for the ritual to be properly completed, the samurai must not flinch or cry out in pain. Seppuku is usually not something a samurai can do at will. Samurai who are facing total battlefield defeat or the military annihilation of their bloodline, however, will sometimes commit seppuku immediately rather than face the eternal shame of utter defeat.

Indeed, entire samurai families have been known to commit suicide under such circumstances. This form of protesting seppuku is known as kanshi, and must still be authorized by the daimyo.

Women of the samurai caste who are not bushi are permitted to kill themselves in a less painful fashion, known as jigai, in which they stab themselves in the throat with a knife.

This is generally reserved for women who are courtier or shugenja. Given the chance, they will bind their ankles together before performing this act, so as not to shame themselves with wild kicking during their death throes. But in the Land of the Rising Sun, samurai do not serve their clans solely on the battlefield.

Indeed, skilful courtiers can sometimes alter the outcomes of wars after the battles are fought. Although some bushi look down on courtiers and the subtle arts of politics, those who must serve their clans in court reject the notion that they are any less samurai than their warrior cousins.

Courtiers must pursue their diplomatic struggles with the same courage and zeal as a bushi in combat, for their failures can be as catastrophic as a lost war, and their victories can bring glory and success to their clan without the need to fight a war at all. Failure in court can mean death as certain as failure in combat — courtiers must walk a perpetual knife-edge, working to obstruct, undermine, and destroy their opponents without falling prey to the same fate themselves. Seasoned bushi who get reassigned to court are often forced to admit it is just as taxing a field of conflict as warfare itself.

In Nippon, politics takes place primarily in the various courts of the Empire. Every daimyo and governor maintains a court in their castle or palace, inviting emissaries and visitors from other families and clans to attend and meet as their guests.

The higher- ranking the host, the more prestigious the court, and the more important will be the political discussions and negotiations which take place there.

The most prestigious court in the Empire, of course, is the Imperial Court, hosted by the Emperor and his chief advisors. Many courtiers spend a lifetime trying to win 17 an appointment there.

Warhammer: Nippon by Mathias Eliasson - Issuu

The heaviest political activity takes place during the winter, and just as the Imperial Court is the most important and prestigious of political postings, the Imperial Court is the most desirable of all courts to spend the snow-bound months.

Court, more than any other part of Nipponese life, is suffused with delicate etiquette and indirect speech. After all, diplomats speak for their clan, and have the weight and prestige of that clan behind them. A minor daimyo who insults or ignores a courtier without legitimate cause could well be forced to commit seppuku for his breach of etiquette.

Nor is anyone so uncouth as to openly discuss alliances or treaties in open court. Trained diplomats employ hints and subtle conversational gambits to suggest a possible topic of discussion. Much of the truly important and crucial negotiation at court takes place in private meetings, rather than in open chambers where others might overhear it.

Nippon for T9A

Political agreements in Nippon are seldom expressed as written treaties, save when both sides wish to present a formal agreement to the rest of the Empire. More commonly, negotiations are handled through personal commitment and word of honour.

Clans trust their courtiers to handle delicate situations, and courtiers in turn can call on the trust of their clan to give their word great weight. DUELING A major part of politics in Nippon is the exchange of letters, and experienced courtiers spend much time and effort each day in composing and sending such missives to each other. A good courtier can maintain a steady flow of correspondence with dozens of people from across the Empire, dropping small tidbits of information to them and carefully reviewing the snippets of gossip they send him in return.

For many courtiers, this network of correspondents can be just as important as the allies in their own court. Correspondence can build an alliance that lasts generations or begin a feud that lasts centuries. Within the courts themselves, critics and blackmailers alike employ letters as their weapon of choice, and lovers use them as their most subtle but most direct gift. When a samurai is insulted or maligned, and even more so if his or her family, clan, or lord is the target of such insults and slanders, he will usually respond by issuing a challenge to a duel.

Duels are considered the appropriate and socially acceptable response for any situation where a samurai feels that honour or reputation has been threatened or compromised.

Indeed, failing to issue a duel means the original insult or slander is left unanswered, in effect making it true. Conversely, once a challenge has been issued, the other samurai must either back down and apologize, retracting whatever slander he issued, or else defend his words with steel. Backing down, of course, is a tremendous loss of prestige and face, and a wise samurai will never issue an insult or accusation without being prepared to back it up in a duel. Duels are not always to the death.

Samurai are not supposed to throw their lives away without cause, and when the insult or offense which caused the duel is not of great magnitude, a duel to first blood, or until one combatant acknowledges defeat, will be considered sufficient. When the insult is serious, however, duels are always lethal, and end only when one or both participants are dead.

Regardless of whether it is to first blood or to the death, a truly honourable duel must be authorized by higher authority. Magistrates also have the power to authorize duels to prove the guilt or innocence of an accused criminal. This is not to say that a duel cannot be fought without such permission.

Unauthorized duels are a regular feature of Nipponese life, especially where samurai passions become involved, and while such duels are considered socially scandalous and improper, they are not punished in the same way as a murder. Typically, the samurai is subjected to little more than house arrest or a public reprimand.

Traditionally, any samurai who wears a katana is signifying his ability to defend himself, and if he is challenged to a duel, he must fight on his own behalf. A samurai who carries only a knife or a wakizashi such as the typical courtier or shugenja is signifying that he is not a warrior and cannot fight his own duels.

If he is challenged, he can call for a champion to fight on his behalf. Likewise, if such a samurai issues a challenge to another, he is expected to have a champion available to fight for him. Usually, daimyo will supply champions for their samurai, although they may refuse to do so if they consider the duel to be fought over insufficient justification. Once the duel is resolved, the losing party is expected to share the fate of their champion, committing seppuku if it was a duel to the death.

When passions are high, the duel may be accepted and fought immediately, but more typically the challenged party will choose a symbolic or beautiful location at some noteworthy time, such as dawn. In theory, a duel can be held weeks or months after acceptance — sometimes as much as a year, though never more than that — but delaying a duel in this manner is often considered a sign of lack of selfconfidence or even cowardice.

Minor wars and border skirmishes are a constant reality of life in the Land of the Rising Sun, where the different clans are constantly jockeying for power and influence, and major wars erupt with some regularity. Armies and Tactics Nipponese armies are primarily infantry forces. The native Nipponese pony is not hardy enough to support full-scale cavalry warfare, although it can be used effectively for scouts or mounted infantry.

Most foreigners are confined to sealed off areas in whichever city they are occupying and dealings with them is often conducted by lower class characters, such as merchants. The Empire Thus, the only samurai who employ true cavalry tactics in Nippon are the Taneka, who imported full-size horses from Cathay.

Other Nipponese armies developed some degree of anti-cavalry training and tactics, but their lack of full-size horses prevented them from deploying any large-scale cavalry force of their own. When armies go into battle, regardless of their strength, it is the smaller units — legions and companies — which form the primary units of tactical manoeuvre. They usually deploy in rectangular blocks, wider than they are deep. Consequently, the Nipponese march and advance in a more dispersed and open formation than Old World armies, and once contact is made with the enemy, any formation will quickly break down into a sprawl of hundreds of small melees.

Thus, battlefield tactics tend to focus more on pre-contact manoeuvring, bringing more troops to bear on the decisive point through effective scouting and skilful march and deployment, and wearing down the enemy with archery and magical attack prior to engagement, as well as on successfully withdrawing and rallying units after combat. When Shogun Yoritomo Ieyasu rose to power, and re-united the warring states of Nippon, he imposed 20 There have been very few dealings with the Empire and few Imperial merchant ships have ever made the long and arduous journey to the Far East.

Emperor Karl-Franz therefore sent a diplomatic mission to Nippon in order to cement some kind of an alliance or treaty. Unfortunately progress has been painfully slow as they try to get to grips with Nippon customs. The fact that they are confined to sealed off foreign quarters in the capital of Hyudo also possess problems as many days can go by without any meetings with Nipponese officials and what is more is that the translators present at all of the meetings are Marienburgoise Clerics of Haendryk.

It is rumoured that they are economical with the truth when relaying back to the Nipponese what the Imperials want and can give in return. However, the Imperials have been successful in converting a few people to the cult of Sigmar both in and outside the city. With dozens of Nipponese Sigmarites created maybe the Empire can make some gains?

Estalia Estalia, especially the great seaport of Magritta, is in competition with Marienburg when it comes to securing trade with the Far East. This has even amounted to clashes in the Ind Ocean between Estalian ships and those of Marienburg.

As these incidences are very embarrassing both sides have conveniently chosen to brush them under the carpet. It was Marienburg who introduced firearms into Nippon some twenty years ago and one of the merchant houses, the den Euwe, has an heir married to a daimyo's daughter Lady Katsi Okumoto.

It is not presumptuous to say that Marienburg has a firm foothold on Nippon. Although they are, like the Imperials, confined to sealed off quarters of Hyudo for most of the time, they also occupy a small island just off the port city called Dejim. The tiny island is complete with its own set of quays so that ships can anchor there and if anything the island is a piece of Marienburg transported some seven thousand miles across the globe.

The Marienburgers were given the island when they first came to Nippon to keep their influences away from the populous as the Jinto priests viewed them with distain because they were merchants. The Marienburgers, while they are happy to join them in their religious ceremonies, do not trust them. Nippon itself has a little community in the city of Marienburg. It was there quite a few years before the present Shogun made it harder for people to leave his island. While he was opposed to it at first Yoritomo has grown used to the arrangement.

High Elves used to live in several of the cities of Nippon pre-Incursions of Chaos, but when Tor Elithis was attacked by the forces of Chaos the vast majority of the Elves left to defend it. Small communities lived on in some of the cities but over the subsequent years they gradually left. Most chose to go back to Ulthuan but those who did not decided to go to the Gates of Calith and reinforce the garrison there against sporadic attacks from Chaos armies.

To this day that is where they remain. The High Elves are welcome in Nippon although they are often feared. The Phoenix King, although he would like to regain Tor Elithis, is more concerned with keeping his island territories in the vast ocean between Cathay and the southern tip of the Southlands which are: the Fortress of Dawn, Tower of Stars, Tor Elasor and the Tower of the Sun.

However, this has not prevented High Elf clippers from exploring the ocean east of Nippon, as in the past, though long ago, the Dark Elves of Naggaroth sailed a Black Ark from the western New World to the coast of Cathay. Fortunately the Black Ark was destroyed therefore preventing a probable Druchii invasion. Nippon came into being when the gods Zanagi and Zanami stood on the bridge of heaven and stirred the waters of the Earth with a spear.

The drops of water that fell from the spear tip gathered together to become the islands of Nippon. The pair then descended and raised the spear as the centre pole of their house. The bride traditionally wears white, the colour of death, at the beginning the wedding, symbolizing that she is dead to her old family. After the ritual is complete and she emerges for the reception, she removes the white kimono to reveal a red one underneath the colour of life, showing she is reborn into her new family.

Once the ceremony is done, the newly wedded couple often spends a month apart, meditating on what it means to be married, before they take up their new household together. The immediate relatives the clan. This is not mandatory, however, and samurai gather at the pyre and use special chopsticks to remove in the more active and pragmatic clans will often the remaining fragments of bone from the ashes these continue to actively serve their lords long after are placed in a crematory urn, which is kept in a place reaching their fortieth year.

High-ranking nobles and of honour for 35 days before finally being buried, an daimyo also tend to stay active longer than the normal event accompanied by a final round of prayers, chants, time. A samurai who does retire will most commonly and blessings. Such retirement RELIGION is accompanied by an extended ritual celebration, in The official religion of Nippon is called Jinto and has which family and friends commemorate the samurais been so for thousands of years.

During Nippon's history deeds and bid him goodbye. At the conclusion of this it has existed as an amorphous mix of nature worship, ritual, the samurai shaves his head, a transformation fertility cults, divination techniques, hero worship, and symbolizing his entering a new life of religious shamanism and unusually it has no recognised founder.

Not all retiring samurai join the monks, It is a religion of nature and spirituality and the belief however some of them instead remain with their that human nature is inherently good, and evil is families or their lords, living quiet but honoured lives, thought to stem from the individual's contact with and offering advice and counsel when it is sought.

Jinto worship is centred on the reverence of the gods or kami. Kami may be anything that is extraordinary and The last ritual of every samurais life is their funeral. Consequently, a wide These, like everything else in Nippon, follow a strict variety of kami exist in Jinto: there are kami related to protocol. By Imperial Law, all bodies must be natural objects and creatures -- the spirits of mountains, cremated. Traditionally, a funeral takes place four days seas, rivers, rocks, trees, animals, and the like; there are after death, and those four days are filled with prayers, guardian kami of particular locales and clans; also as well as the burning of special scrolls filled with last considered kami are exceptional human beings, words which are the final parting words of the living including many emperors.

Evil spirits are also known to the dead. The body is anointed and purified by eta, in Jinto, but few seem irredeemably so. While a god then kept in state with an honour guard until the day of may first call attention to its presence through a display the cremation itself.

Special foods are prepared on that of rowdy or even destructive behaviour, generally day, and relatives and friends gather to observe the speaking, the kami are benign. Their role is to sustain funeral pyre, which is also blessed by shugenja and and protect. Once the body has been burned, even more 13 In a way Jinto is similar to the Old World religion in Courage that it consists of a pantheon of deities. However, the Courage is in many ways the most basic and universal priests of Jinto worship all the gods or kami as one of all the Bushido virtues, since every samurai is rather than there being any single clerics of a particular expected to be ready and able to die at a moments god.

Although some gods are more popular than others, notice. The central importance of courage to a such as the Sun Goddess Amateratsu for example, it is samurais life cannot be understated. A samurai must highly unusual for anyone to take on a monotheistic be prepared to fight and die without hesitation, whether perspective.

There are hundreds, perhaps even at his lords command or simply due to unavoidable thousands, of gods in the Jinto pantheon which are circumstance. Indeed, it is popular to say that a samurai discussed further in this chapter but suffice to say the lives at all times three feet from death, since that is the Sun Goddess Amateratsu is one of the most pre- reach of a katana.

But in truth there is no clan which eminent of the kami as well as the divine couple ignores courage. All recognize that courage is Zanagi and Zanami who were said to have created important if their samurai are to fulfil their duties Nippon. After all, a samurais life belongs to his and demanding set of ethical principles known as lord, not to him.

A samurai who throws his life away in Bushido literally, the way of the warrior. They a useless and selfish gesture is not behaving quickly came to be accepted by all the clans in Nippon, honourably, but rather is failing in his duty to lord and and as the roles of samurai evolved to include courtiers clan.

Indeed, there are many times when retreating and artisans, the Code of Bushido evolved into a from a fight requires more courage than merely staying complete philosophical view of the role and duty of the and dying. In modern Nippon, Bushido is integral to almost every aspect of a samurais life, and the proper Courtesy way to uphold the Code is a subject of continual Samurai are civilized men and women, not barbarians, discussion and debate among all samurai. A samurai who shows undue Bushido is comprised of seven Virtues: Courage, emotion or rudeness is not only violating Courtesy but Compassion, Courtesy, Duty, Honesty, Honour, and is also losing his face on , disrespecting those around Sincerity.

These virtues are held to represent the proper him and shaming himself. A true samurai remains way in which samurai should live and serve their lords. In practice, however, few samurai can live such spotless lives. Moreover, every clan in Nippon views Bushido in a slightly different way, according to their respective views of duty, honour, and life.

The true nature of Bushido is constantly debated within the courts of Nippon, and the true way to uphold its Virtues is seldom fully agreed upon even within the same clan. Every clan, has its idealists who try to uphold every Virtue no matter the cost, just as every clan contains a few dark souls who laugh at Bushido and flout its principles. Compassion Compassion teaches samurai that, as the warrior elite of society, it is their duty to protect and guide the lesser folk of Nippon.

In its most obvious form, this means offering military protection, guarding the commoners against bandits, criminals, foreigners, and the monsters of Haikido. It is this form of Compassion which is most widely respected and revered in Nippon, for all clans recognize the importance of keeping their peasants alive and productive. Bullying or abusing those of lower station is an act unworthy of a samurai, even if the social order allows it. Some clans take Compassion more fully to heart, however, and seek to offer guidance and help to the lower castes.

Ideally, it would seem obvious that an honourable warrior should always tell the truth, and indeed, there are some families and clans which embrace Honesty with the same fervour as the rest of the virtues.

Honesty is also strongly associated with justice, and thus tends to be a virtue admired by magistrates or at least by those magistrates who take their duties to heart. However, many other samurai, especially those who serve their clans in court, find that Honesty is often a virtue which must be danced around, or perhaps even violated, in order to fulfil their duties.

Almost all those samurai who serve in the arena of court and politics practice the art of deceiving or manipulating their opponents while still remaining technically truthful, and some families make almost an art form of employing such tactics while still satisfying themselves that they are behaving honourably.

Most highly political schools and families quietly accept that sometimes they will simply have to lie for their clan, and therefore tend to emphasize Sincerity far more than Honesty in their approach to Bushido, counting on their facing his bitterest sworn enemy, or provoked with vile adherence to the other virtues to make up for their insults and malignant behaviour.

A samurai who sometimes erratic observance of this one. The openly insults others is showing his own weakness, Scorpion, naturally, ignore Honesty altogether, and which is why Nipponese courtiers endlessly practice exhibit almost open contempt for samurai who strive to the art of the subtle and indirect insult. Conversely, tell the truth or who follow the path of justice. Nipponese as a whole make a point of over himself, at all times.

Bushido is not merely ignoring those who engage in uncouth and improper enforced by social convention or superior authority, but spectacles, since to draw attention to such discourteous by each samurais own heart and soul. A samurai behaviour is to make matters even worse. Conversely, a politics and the courts tend to place a very strong samurai with true Honour will follow the ways of emphasis on Courtesy, since it is a vital element of Bushido even when the society around him becomes social and political negotiation.

The most heavily corrupt and his superiors expect him to behave political clans place a special value on Courtesy, dishonourably solely because they command it. Duty If there is a Virtue which competes with Courage for universal acceptance, it is Duty. A samurai must always be ready to serve his lord in whatever way is Sincerity required, no matter what the cost. Death is the least that Samurai are taught from childhood that they must a samurai may face he must be prepared to endure express absolute sincerity in both word and deed.

A humiliation, dishonour, shame, and failure for the sake samurai who speaks on behalf of his lord in court, but of Duty. He must remain faithful to lord, family, clan, does so in a lackadaisical or unconvincing manner, is and comrades no matter what temptations may fall in serving his lord as badly as if he refused to speak at all.

A samurai who violates loyalty to his lord or A samurai who shows a lack of dedication in his clan is violating Duty, and such untrustworthy actions, who acts and behaves without absolute individuals are hardly worthy of the title samurai.

Sincerity is regarded with particular admiration samurai, since a samurai in love will feel a conflicting by political clans and families, but most samurai loyalty to his or her beloved which may disrupt or respect it. It the individual. In Nippon a family is the repository of is intrinsic to the belief that samurai are exceptional all the collective deeds and accomplishments of its persons, chosen by birth to serve the Empire in ways members, and it is commonly said, I have borrowed that mere peasants cannot.

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A samurai is expected to my name from my ancestors. I must return it to them maintain self-discipline at all times, to control himself untarnished. A dishonoured person thus brings and to never show the sort of open emotions and out- dishonour and shame to the entire family. By of-control behaviour that characterizes lower people.

Thus, maintaining dignity and self-control is setting dresses entirely in white the colour of death , vital to a samurais life. The The ability to maintain this self-control, never showing ritual may be witnessed by the samurais friends or ones true feelings, is referred to as maintaining ones relatives, representatives from his daimyo, or other on or face.

A samurai who maintains face is a individuals. The actual suicide is usually performed by samurai who cannot be manipulated, a samurai who means of the wakizashi, the blade which symbolizes a can deceive his enemies, a samurai who serves his clan samurais honour although another blade can be without fail. By contrast, a samurai who loses face, substituted in a pinch. The samurai kneels and makes who loses self-control, shames both himself and, three cuts across his belly, disembowelling himself.

In worse, his family and clan. Since this is Face is a purely samurai concept, one that is not extremely difficult, by long-standing tradition seppuku expected of peasants and other common folk. Serving as a samurais every day, concealing ones true feelings beneath on. A samurai who is shamed by dishonourable actions or Seppuku is usually not something a samurai can do at loss of face will be expected, at the very least, to offer will. Samurai who are facing total battlefield defeat or deep and sincere apologies for such actions.

Typically, the military annihilation of their bloodline, however, if the disgrace was fairly modest, the samurai will be punished in a non-permanent way assignment to less prestigious duties, for example, or expulsion from the castle, court, or city where he misbehaved.

Although such punishments are not lethal, they nevertheless represent a deep and profound shame for the samurai involved, who may well spend the rest of his life trying to redeem himself for his failure. More extreme failures, such as a violent outburst, an attack or serious insult against someone of higher station, or a breach of duty or loyalty, are punished much more severely.

A samurai who commits such acts is quite likely to be ordered to commit seppuku if he does not offer seppuku himself out of shame. On other occasions, such disgraced samurai may be expelled from family and clan, and thus made ronin. A samurai may also forsake his fealty and become ronin by his own choice rather than face the prospect of punishment or seppuku, particularly if he feels he is not actually guilty.

Seppuku is a form of ritual suicide which samurai perform when they have been irretrievably dishonoured.

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By performing the ceremony and thus dying honourably, the samurai wipes away the stain of dishonour and leaves his or her family name clean and untarnished.

It is important to remember that the main 16 will sometimes commit seppuku immediately rather negotiations and manoeuvres of courtiers have changed than face the eternal shame of utter defeat. Indeed, the Empire as often as war, if not more so. Indeed, entire samurai families have been known to commit skilful courtiers can sometimes alter the outcomes of suicide under such circumstances. More normally, wars after the battles are fought. Courtiers must pursue their Aside from acting to preserve family honour, the other diplomatic struggles with the same courage and zeal as form of permissible seppuku is to protest unjust orders a bushi in combat, for their failures can be as from ones lord.

This form of protesting seppuku is catastrophic as a lost war, and their victories can bring known as kanshi, and must still be authorized by the glory and success to their clan without the need to fight daimyo. Most daimyo dont care for such an act, but it a war at all. Failure in court can mean death as certain is considered quite dishonourable and ill-mannered to as failure in combat courtiers must walk a perpetual refuse ones samurai permission to commit kanshi.

Seasoned bushi who get re- permitted to kill themselves in a less painful fashion, assigned to court are often forced to admit it is just as known as jigai, in which they stab themselves in the taxing a field of conflict as warfare itself.

This is generally reserved for women who are courtier or shugenja. Given the chance, In Nippon, politics takes place primarily in the various they will bind their ankles together before performing courts of the Empire. Every daimyo and governor this act, so as not to shame themselves with wild maintains a court in their castle or palace, inviting kicking during their death throes. The higher- ranking the POLITICS host, the more prestigious the court, and the more The way of the samurai is often considered important will be the political discussions and synonymous with the way of the warrior.

But in the negotiations which take place there. The most Land of the Rising Sun, samurai do not serve their prestigious court in the Empire, of course, is the clans solely on the battlefield. Politics has been a vital Imperial Court, hosted by the Emperor and his chief element of Nippons history since its founding, and the advisors.

Many courtiers spend a lifetime trying to win 17 an appointment there. The heaviest political activity takes place during the winter, and just as the Imperial Court is the most important and prestigious of political postings, the Imperial Court is the most desirable of all courts to spend the snow-bound months.

Court, more than any other part of Nipponese life, is suffused with delicate etiquette and indirect speech. After all, diplomats speak for their clan, and have the weight and prestige of that clan behind them.