echecs16.info Novels PARADISE LOST NOVEL PDF

PARADISE LOST NOVEL PDF

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Free PDF, epub, Kindle ebook. Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton. It is considered by critics to be. justified in calling Milton's epic poem a novel. Initially, I would expect that very few readers of Paradise Lost could imagine the merging of two such different. Saylor URL: echecs16.info Attributed to: [Thomas H. Luxon] echecs16.info Page 1 of Paradise Lost BOOK 1. John Milton ().


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BOOK I. Of Mans First Disobedience, and the Fruit. Of that Forbidden Tree, He trusted to have equal'd the most High,. - 1 -. BOOK I. Milton: Paradise Lost. Paradise Lost. Book I. Of Man's first disobedience, and the fruit. Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste. Brought death into the World, and all our woe. Download our free ePUB, PDF or MOBI eBooks to read on almost any device — your desktop, iPhone, iPad, Paradise Lost Get your free eBook now!.

In Heav'n, which follows dignity, might draw [ 25 ] Envy from each inferior; but who here Will envy whom the highest place exposes Formost to stand against the Thunderers aim Your bulwark, and condemns to greatest share Of endless pain? With this advantage then [ 35 ] To union, and firm Faith, and firm accord, More then can be in Heav'n, we now return To claim our just inheritance of old, Surer to prosper then prosperity Could have assur'd us; and by what best way, [ 40 ] Whether of open Warr or covert guile, We now debate; who can advise, may speak. He ceas'd, and next him Moloc, Scepter'd King Stood up, the strongest and the fiercest Spirit That fought in Heav'n; now fiercer by despair: [ 45 ] His trust was with th' Eternal to be deem'd Equal in strength, and rather then be less Care'd not to be at all; with that care lost Went all his fear: of God, or Hell, or worse He reck'd not , and these words thereafter spake. For while they sit contriving, shall the rest, Millions that stand in Arms, and longing wait [ 55 ] The Signal to ascend, sit lingring here Heav'ns fugitives, and for thir dwelling place Accept this dark opprobrious Den of shame, The Prison of his Tyranny who Reigns By our delay? But perhaps [ 70 ] The way seems difficult and steep to scale With upright wing against a higher foe. Let such bethink them, if the sleepy drench Of that forgetful Lake benumm not still, That in our proper motion we ascend [ 75 ] Up to our native seat: descent and fall To us is adverse.

More destroy'd then thus We should be quite abolisht and expire. What fear we then? On th' other side up rose Belial, in act more graceful and humane; A fairer person lost not Heav'n; he seemd [ ] For dignity compos'd and high exploit: But all was false and hollow; though his Tongue Dropt Manna , and could make the worse appear The better reason , to perplex and dash Maturest Counsels: for his thoughts were low; [ ] To vice industrious, but to Nobler deeds Timorous and slothful: yet he pleas'd the ear, And with perswasive accent thus began.

Paradise Lost by John Milton - Free Ebook

I should be much for open Warr, O Peers, As not behind in hate; if what was urg'd [ ] Main reason to persuade immediate Warr, Did not disswade me most, and seem to cast Ominous conjecture on the whole success: When he who most excels in fact of Arms, In what he counsels and in what excels [ ] Mistrustful, grounds his courage on despair And utter dissolution, as the scope Of all his aim, after some dire revenge. First, what Revenge? Or could we break our way By force, and at our heels all Hell should rise [ ] With blackest Insurrection, to confound Heav'ns purest Light, yet our great Enemy All incorruptible would on his Throne Sit unpolluted, and th' Ethereal mould Incapable of stain would soon expel [ ] Her mischief, and purge off the baser fire Victorious.

Thus repuls'd, our final hope Is flat despair; we must exasperate Th' Almighty Victor to spend all his rage, And that must end us, that must be our cure, [ ] To be no more; sad cure; for who would loose, Though full of pain, this intellectual being, Those thoughts that wander through Eternity, To perish rather, swallowd up and lost In the wide womb of uncreated night, [ ] Devoid of sense and motion?

Will he, so wise, let loose at once his ire, [ ] Belike through impotence, or unaware, To give his Enemies thir wish, and end Them in his anger, whom his anger saves To punish endless? Say they who counsel Warr, we are decreed, [ ] Reserv'd and destin'd to Eternal woe; Whatever doing, what can we suffer more, What can we suffer worse?

What when we fled amain , pursu'd and strook [ ] With Heav'ns afflicting Thunder, and besought The Deep to shelter us? What if the breath that kindl'd those grim fires [ ] Awak'd should blow them into sevenfold rage And plunge us in the flames?

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Warr therefore, open or conceal'd, alike My voice disswades; for what can force or guile With him, or who deceive his mind, whose eye Views all things at one view? Shall we then live thus vile, the race of Heav'n Thus trampl'd, thus expell'd to suffer here [ ] Chains and these Torments? To suffer, as to doe, Our strength is equal, nor the Law unjust [ ] That so ordains: this was at first resolv'd, If we were wise, against so great a foe Contending, and so doubtful what might fall.

I laugh, when those who at the Spear are bold And vent'rous, if that fail them, shrink and fear [ ] What yet they know must follow, to endure Exile, or ignominy, or bonds, or pain, The sentence of thir Conquerour: This is now Our doom; which if we can sustain and bear, Our Supream Foe in time may much remit [ ] His anger, and perhaps thus farr remov'd Not mind us not offending, satisfi'd With what is punish't; whence these raging fires Will slack'n, if his breath stir not thir flames.

Our purer essence then will overcome [ ] Thir noxious vapour, or enur'd not feel, Or chang'd at length, and to the place conformd In temper and in nature, will receive Familiar the fierce heat, and void of pain; This horror will grow milde, this darkness light, [ ] Besides what hope the never-ending flight Of future dayes may bring, what chance, what change Worth waiting, since our present lot appeers For happy though but ill, for ill not worst, If we procure not to our selves more woe.

Either to disinthrone the King of Heav'n We warr, if Warr be best, or to regain [ ] Our own right lost: him to unthrone we then May hope when everlasting Fate shall yeild To fickle Chance, and Chaos judge the strife: The former vain to hope argues as vain The latter: for what place can be for us [ ] Within Heav'ns bound, unless Heav'ns Lord supream We overpower?

Suppose he should relent And publish Grace to all, on promise made Of new Subjection; with what eyes could we Stand in his presence humble, and receive [ ] Strict Laws impos'd, to celebrate his Throne With warbl'd Hymns, and to his Godhead sing Forc't Halleluiah's; while he Lordly sits Our envied Sovran, and his Altar breathes Ambrosial Odours and Ambrosial Flowers , [ ] Our servile offerings.

This must be our task In Heav'n , this our delight; how wearisom Eternity so spent in worship paid To whom we hate. Let us not then pursue By force impossible, by leave obtain'd [ ] Unacceptable, though in Heav'n, our state Of splendid vassalage, but rather seek Our own good from our selves, and from our own Live to our selves, though in this vast recess, Free, and to none accountable, preferring [ ] Hard liberty before the easie yoke Of servile Pomp.

Our greatness will appeer Then most conspicuous, when great things of small, Useful of hurtful, prosperous of adverse We can create, and in what place so e're [ ] Thrive under evil, and work ease out of pain Through labour and indurance. This deep world Of darkness do we dread?

ANALYSIS OF PARADISE LOST, BOOK I.pdf

How oft amidst Thick clouds and dark doth Heav'ns all-ruling Sire Choose to reside, his Glory unobscur'd, [ ] And with the Majesty of darkness round Covers his Throne; from whence deep thunders roar Must'ring thir rage, and Heav'n resembles Hell? As he our darkness, cannot we his Light Imitate when we please? This Desart soile [ ] Wants not her hidden lustre, Gemms and Gold; Nor want we skill or Art , from whence to raise Magnificence; and what can Heav'n shew more?

Our torments also may in length of time Become our Elements , these piercing Fires [ ] As soft as now severe, our temper chang'd Into their temper; which must needs remove The sensible of pain. All things invite To peaceful Counsels, and the settl'd State Of order, how in safety best we may [ ] Compose our present evils, with regard Of what we are and were , dismissing quite All thoughts of warr: ye have what I advise.

Paradise Lost: The Novel

He scarce had finisht, when such murmur filld Th' Assembly, as when hollow Rocks retain [ ] The sound of blustring winds, which all night long Had rous'd the Sea, now with hoarse cadence lull Sea-faring men orewatcht , whose Bark by chance Or Pinnace anchors in a craggy Bay After the Tempest: Such applause was heard [ ] As Mammon ended, and his Sentence pleas'd, Advising peace: for such another Field They dreaded worse then Hell: so much the fear Of Thunder and the Sword of Michael Wrought still within them; and no less desire [ ] To found this nether Empire, which might rise By pollicy , and long process of time, In emulation opposite to Heav'n.

Which when Beelzebub perceiv'd, then whom, Satan except, none higher sat, with grave [ ] Aspect he rose, and in his rising seem'd A Pillar of State; deep on his Front engraven Deliberation sat and public care; And Princely counsel in his face yet shon, Majestic though in ruin: sage he stood [ ] With Atlantean shoulders fit to bear The weight of mightiest Monarchies; his look Drew audience and attention still as Night Or Summers Noon-tide air, while thus he spake.

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Thrones and Imperial Powers, off-spring of heav'n [ ] Ethereal Vertues ; or these Titles now Must we renounce, and changing stile be call'd Princes of Hell? What sit we then projecting peace and Warr?

Novel pdf lost paradise

Warr hath determin'd us, and foild with loss [ ] Irreparable; tearms of peace yet none Voutsaf't or sought; for what peace will be giv'n To us enslav'd, but custody severe, And stripes, and arbitrary punishment Inflicted? What if we find Some easier enterprize? There is a place [ ] If ancient and prophetic fame in Heav'n Err not another World, the happy seat Of some new Race call'd Man, about this time To be created like to us, though less In power and excellence, but favour'd more [ ] Of him who rules above; so was his will Pronounc'd among the Gods , and by an Oath , That shook Heav'ns whol circumference, confirm'd.

Thither let us bend all our thoughts, to learn What creatures there inhabit, of what mould, [ ] Or substance, how endu'd , and what thir Power, And where thir weakness, how attempted best, By force or suttlety: Though Heav'n be shut, And Heav'ns high Arbitrator sit secure In his own strength, this place may lye expos'd [ ] The utmost border of his Kingdom, left To their defence who hold it: here perhaps Som advantagious act may be achiev'd By sudden onset, either with Hell fire To waste his whole Creation, or possess [ ] All as our own, and drive as we were driven, The punie habitants, or if not drive, Seduce them to our Party, that thir God May prove thir foe, and with repenting hand Abolish his own works.

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This would surpass [ ] Common revenge, and interrupt his joy In our Confusion , and our Joy upraise In his disturbance; when his darling Sons Hurl'd headlong to partake with us, shall curse Thir frail Original , and faded bliss, [ ] Faded so soon. To bow and sue for grace With suppliant knee, and deifie his power, Who from the terrour of this Arm so late Doubted his Empire, that were low indeed, That were an ignominy and shame beneath This downfall; since by Fate the strength of Gods And this Empyreal substance cannot fail, Since through experience of this great event In Arms not worse, in foresight much advanc't, We may with more successful hope resolve To wage by force or guile eternal Warr Irreconcileable, to our grand Foe, Who now triumphs, and in th' excess of joy Sole reigning holds the Tyranny of Heav'n.

So spake th' Apostate Angel, though in pain, Vaunting aloud, but rackt with deep despare: And him thus answer'd soon his bold Compeer. O Prince, O Chief of many Throned Powers, That led th' imbattelld Seraphim to Warr Under thy conduct, and in dreadful deeds Fearless, endanger'd Heav'ns perpetual King; And put to proof his sigh Supremacy, Whether upheld by strength, or Chance, or Fate, Too well I see and rue the dire event, That with sad overthrow and foul defeat Hath lost us Heav'n, and all this mighty Host In horrible destruction laid thus low, As far as Gods and Heav'nly Essences Can perish: for the mind and spirit remains Invincible, and vigour soon returns, Though all our Glory extinct and happy state Here swallow'd up in endless misery.

But what if he our Conquerour, whom I now Of force believe Almighty, since no less Then such could hav orepow'rd such force as ours Have left us this our spirit and strength intire Strongly to suffer and support our pains, That we may so suffice his vengeful ire, Or do him mightier service as his thralls By right of Warr, what e're his business be Here in the heart of Hell to work in Fire, Or do his Errands in the gloomy Deep; What can it then avail though yet we feel Strength undiminisht, or eternal being To undergo eternal punishment?

Whereto with speedy words th' Arch-fiend reply'd.

Paradise Lost by John Milton

Fall'n Cherube, to be weak is miserable Doing or Suffering: but of this be sure, To do ought good never will be our task, But ever to do ill our sole delight, As being the contrary to his high will Whom we resist. If then his Providence Out of our evil seek to bring forth good, Our labour must be to pervert that end, And out of good still to find means of evil; Which oft times may succeed, so as perhaps Shall grieve him, if I fail not, and disturb His inmost counsels from thir destind aim.

But see the angry Victor hath recall'd His Ministers of vengeance and pursuit Back to the Gates of Heav'n: the Sulphurous Hail Shot after us in storm, oreblown hath laid The fiery Surge, that from the Precipice Of Heav'n receiv'd us falling, and the Thunder, Wing'd with red Lightning and impetuous rage, Perhaps hath spent his shafts, and ceases now To bellow through the vast and boundless Deep. Let us not slip th' occasion, whether scorn, Or satiate fury yield it from our Foe.

Seest thou yon dreary Plain, forlorn and wilde, The seat of desolation, voyd of light, Save what the glimmering of these livid flames Casts pale and dreadful? Thither let us tend From off the tossing of these fiery waves, There rest, if any rest can harbour there, And reassembling our afflicted Powers, Consult how we may henceforth most offend Our Enemy, our own loss how repair, How overcome this dire Calamity, What reinforcement we may gain from Hope, If not what resolution from despare.

Forthwith upright he rears from off the Pool His mighty Stature; on each hand the flames Drivn backward slope thir pointing spires, and rowld In billows, leave i'th'midst a horrid Vale. Then with expanded wings he stears his flight Aloft, incumbent on the dusky Air That felt unusual weight, till on dry Land He lights, as if it were Land that ever burn'd With solid, as the Lake with liquid fire; And such appear'd in hue, as when the force Of subterranean wind transports a Hill Torn from Pelorus, or the shatter'd side Of thundring Aetna, whose combustible And fewel'd entrals thence conceiving Fire, Sublim'd with Mineral fury, aid the Winds, And leave a singed bottom all involv'd With stench and smoak: Such resting found the sole Of unblest feet.

Him followed his next Mate, Both glorying to have scap't the Stygian flood As Gods, and by thir own recover'd strength, Not by the sufferance of supernal Power. Is this the Region, this the Soil, the Clime, Said then the lost Arch-Angel, this the seat That we must change for Heav'n, this mournful gloom For that celestial light?

Be it so, since he Who now is Sovran can dispose and bid What shall be right: fardest from him his best Whom reason hath equald, force hath made supream Above his equals. What matter where, if I be still the same, And what I should be, all but less then he Whom Thunder hath made greater? Here at least We shall be free; th' Almighty hath not built Here for his envy, will not drive us hence: Here we may reign secure, and in my choyce To reign is worth ambition though in Hell: Better to reign in Hell, then serve in Heav'n.

But wherefore let we then our faithful friends, Th' associates and copartners of our loss Lye thus astonisht on th' oblivious Pool, And call them not to share with us their part In this unhappy Mansion, or once more With rallied Arms to try what may be yet Regaind in Heav'n, or what more lost in Hell?

So Satan spake, and him Beelzebub Thus answer'd. Leader of those Armies bright, Which but th' Omnipotent none could have foyld, If once they hear that voyce, thir liveliest pledge Of hope in fears and dangers, heard so oft In worst extreams, and on the perilous edge Of battel when it rag'd, in all assaults Thir surest signal, they will soon resume New courage and revive, though now they lye Groveling and prostrate on yon Lake of Fire, As we erewhile, astounded and amaz'd, No wonder, fall'n such a pernicious highth.

He scarce had ceas't when the superiour Fiend Was moving toward the shoar; his ponderous shield Ethereal temper, massy, large and round, Behind him cast; the broad circumference Hung on his shoulders like the Moon, whose Orb Through Optic Glass the Tuscan Artist views At Ev'ning from the top of Fesole, Or in Valdarno, to descry new Lands, Rivers or Mountains in her spotty Globe.